This Week in Sociological Perspective
(Audio) Economists talk money. Politicians talk government. On This Week in Sociological Perspective we talk money, politics, and everything else that makes the world go ‘round, offering insight on society, public affairs, and news of the week. Guest authors join your host, UC-Berkeley Professor Samuel Roundfield Lucas, to transcend the headlines through fascinating research in sociology.

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This week we discuss a revealing escalation in political conflict in the United States. And, I recently spoke with Professor Yader Lanuza of the University of California-Santa Barbara about his recent paper titled “Giving (Money) Back To Parents: Racial/Ethnic and Immigrant-Native Variation in Monetary Exchanges During the Transition to Adulthood.” The paper is to be published in Sociological Forum, and is sole-authored.

Segment 1 -- Yader Lanuza on “Giving (Money) Back To Parents: Racial/Ethnic and Immigrant-Native Variation in Monetary Exchanges During the Transition to Adulthood”

Segment 2 -- An escalating political conflict reveals raw power to be the only operating principle of some U.S. officials

Direct download: TWiSP2020m09d24audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 12:22am PDT
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This week we discuss an interesting act of altruism. And, I recently spoke with Chris Smith, Assistant Professor of Sociology of the University of Toronto, about her recent paper titled “Exogenous Shocks, the Criminal Elite, and Increasing Gender Inequality in Chicago Organized Crime.” The paper is to be published in the American Sociological Review, and is sole-authored.

Segment 1 – Chris Smith on “Exogenous Shocks, the Criminal Elite, and Increasing Gender Inequality in Chicago Organized Crime.”

Segment 2 – Unexplained Altruism between Nations and Peoples.

Direct download: TWiSP2020m09d17audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 2:00am PDT
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This week we discuss the protests in Portland, Oregon. And, I recently spoke with Eiko Strader, Assistant Professor of Public Policy & Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at George Washington University, about her recent paper titled “Will You Die for Your Country? Workplace Death in an Era of Mass Incarceration.” The paper is to be published in Sociological Forum, and is co-authored by Miranda Hines.

Segment 1 -- Eiko Strader on “Will You Die for Your Country? Workplace Death in an Era of Mass Incarceration.”

Segment 2 -- Challenges and possibilities of expanding the cultural toolkit of protestors in the shadow of the Portland protests.

Direct download: TWiSP2020m09Thu10audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 1:46am PDT
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This week I spoke with Professor Donald Tomaskovic-Devey of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, about the situation of labor as we approach the Labor day holiday. And, I recently spoke with Cindy Cain, Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Alabama-Birmingham, about her recent paper titled “Quelling moral panics? The case of physician aid in dying in California”. The paper is scheduled to be published in Poetics and is sole-authored.

Segment 1 -- Cindy Cain on “Quelling moral panics? The case of physician aid in dying in California”

Segment 2 -- Donald Tomaskovic-Devey on conditions of work, the state of workers, and prospects for change this Labor day.

Direct download: TWiSP2020m09Thu03Audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 2:11am PDT
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This week we discuss an epic shift in the source of electricity in the United States, and the upheavals the shift has produced. And, I recently spoke with Dr. Cassandra Engeman of Stockholm University about her recent paper titled “When Do Unions Matter to Social Policy? Organized Labor and Leave Legislation in the United States.” The paper is to be published in Social Forces, and is sole-authored.

Segment 1 -- Cassandra Engeman on “When Do Unions Matter to Social Policy? Organized Labor and Leave Legislation in the United States.”

Segment 2 -- The canary in the coal mine: The decline of coal, renewable replacements, and economic hardship in coal-producing Wyoming.

Direct download: TWiSP2020m08Thu27audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 12:35am PDT
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This week we discuss an important threshold the world has crossed. And, I speak with Professor Emily Kennedy of the Department of Sociology of the University of British Columbia about her recent paper titled “Accidental environmentalist or ethical elite? The moral dimensions of environmental impact.” The paper is to be published in Poetics, and is co-authored by Christine Horne.

Segment 1 -- Emily Kennedy on “Accidental environmentalist or ethical elite? The moral dimensions of environmental impact"

Segment 2 -- Sociological and methodological reflections on the passing of an important threshold.

Direct download: TWiSP2020m08Thu20audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 1:00am PDT
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This week I am joined by a panel of experts to discuss re-opening schools, remote instruction, and many other challenges and possibilities of the coming academic year.

Panelists:
Mark Berends, Professor of Sociology, University of Notre Dame
Jessica Calarco, Associate Professor of Sociology, Indiana University
Jan Stets, Professor of Sociology, University of California-Riverside

Direct download: TWiSP2020m08Thu13audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 11:01pm PDT
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This week we note that Thursday, August 6th marks the 75th Anniversary of the Hiroshima bombing. And, we speak with Professor Courtney Boen of the University of Pennsylvania about her recent paper titled “Criminal Justice Contacts and  Psychophysiological Functioning in Early Adulthood: Health Inequality in the Carceral State.” The paper is to be published in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, and is sole-authored.

Segment 1 -- Courtney Boen on “Criminal Justice Contacts and  Psychophysiological Functioning in Early Adulthood: Health Inequality in the Carceral State."

Segment 2 -- Sociological reflections on the 75th Anniversary of the Hiroshima nuclear bombing.

Direct download: TWiSP2020m08Thu06audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 11:33pm PDT
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This week we discuss the story of the living son of a Virginia slave, and what his story might mean for us today. And, I speak with Professor Kristen Hourigan of the California State University-Los Angeles about her recent paper titled “Girls Try, Boys Aim High: Exposing Difference in Implied Ability, Activity, and Agency of Girls Versus Boys in Language on McDonald’s Happy Meal Boxes.” The paper is to be published in the journal Sex Roles, and is sole-authored.

Segment 1 -- Kristen Hourigan on “Girls Try, Boys Aim High: Exposing Difference in Implied Ability, Activity, and Agency of Girls Versus Boys in Language on McDonald's Happy Meal Boxes."

Segment 2 -- Sociological reflections on a living son of a slave.

Direct download: TWiSP2020m07Thu30Audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 10:54pm PDT
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This week we discuss challenges that may attend the eventual release of a COVID-19 vaccine in the U.S. And, I recently spoke with Professor Mary Kate Blake of Valparaiso University about her recent paper titled “Other Duties as Assigned: The Ambiguous Role of the High School Counselor.” The paper is to be published in Sociology of Education.

Segment 1 -- Mary Kate Blake on “Other Duties as Assigned: The Ambiguous Role of the High School Counselor."

Segment 2 -- Causes and implications of the social capital deficit, and its import for COVID-19 vaccine utilization.

Direct download: TWiSP2020m07Thu23audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 12:53am PDT
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This week I spoke with Dr. Bryan Ellis, Senior Lecturer in the Irvin D. Reid Honors College at Wayne State University, about the sociology of sport, the relation between sports and society, and how that relation may be made visible in this pandemic. But first, I recently spoke with Dr. Liana Christin Landivar, Faculty Affiliate, Maryland Population Research Center, about her recent paper titled “First-Birth Timing and the Motherhood Wage Gap in 140 Occupations.” The paper is scheduled to be published in Socius.

Segment 1 -- Liana Christin Landivar on "First-Birth Timing and the Motherhood Wage Gap in 140 Occupations."

Segment 2 -- Bryan Ellis on the sociology of sports in the context of COVID-19.

Direct download: TWiSP2020m07Thu16Audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 1:29am PDT
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This week we discuss how the 2020 Census is doing, and what its progress tells Americans about themselves. And, I speak with Professor Holly Campeau of the University of Alberta about her recent paper titled “Policing, Recognition, and the Bind of Legal Cynicism.” The paper is to be published in Social Problems, and is co-authored by Ron Levi and Todd Foglesong.

Segment 1 -- Holly Campeau on “Policing, Recognition, and the Bind of Legal Cynicism."

Segment 2 -- Sociological implications of the uneven progress of the 2020 Census.

Direct download: TWiSP2020m07Thu09audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 7:36pm PDT
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This week I discuss the removal of the confederate flag from the Mississippi state flag. And, I speak with Professor Molly Martin of Pennsylvania State University about her recent paper titled “Are Feminine Body Weight Norms Different for Black Students or in Black Schools? Girls’ Weight-Related Peer Acceptance across Racialized School Contexts.” The paper is to be published in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, and is co-authored by Tori Thomas; Gary J. Adler, Jr.; and Derek A Kreager.

Segment 1 -- Molly Martin on “Are Feminine Body Weight Norms Different for Black Students or in Black Schools? Girls’ Weight-Related Peer Acceptance across Racialized School Contexts."

Segment 2 -- Sociological insights on the role and power of symbols, the meanings of the confederate flag, and the implications of symbolic change alone.

Direct download: TWiSP2020m07Thu02audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 6:54pm PDT
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This week we discuss mortgages and climate change. And, I recently spoke with Professor Caroline Hartnett of the University of South Carolina about her recent paper titled “Racial Disparities in Emotional Well-Being during Pregnancy.” The paper is to be published in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, and is co-authored by Mia Brantley.

Segment 1 -- Caroline Hartnett on “Racial Disparities in Emotional Well-Being during Pregnancy."

Segment 2 -- Sociological insights on changes in mortgages in response to climate change.

Direct download: TWiSP2020m06Thu25audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 7:50pm PDT
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This week we discuss the Bostock V. Clayton County, Georgia Supreme Court decision. And, I recently spoke with Brian Fitzpatrick, a Doctoral Candidate at the University of Notre Dame, about his recent paper titled “The Right Fit? Classroom Mismatch in Middle School and Its Inconsistent Effect on Student Learning.” The paper is to be published in Sociology of Education, and is co-authored by Sarah Mustillo.

Segment 1 -- Brian Fitzpatrick on "The Right Fit? Classroom Mismatch in Middle School and Its Inconsistent Effect on Student Learning."

Segment 2 -- Sociological insights on the majority and minority opinions in Bostock v. Clayton County.

Direct download: TWiSP2020m006Thu18.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 2:00am PDT
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This week we discuss calls to defund the police. And, I recently spoke with Suzanne Model , who is Emirita Professor of Sociology at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, and Research Associate, Center for Research on International Migration at the University of California-Irvine. We discussed her recent paper titled “Patterns of Black–White Partnership: Black Ethnics and African Americans Compared.” The paper will be published in the Journal of Marriage and Family.

Segment 1 -- Suzanne Model on “Patterns of Black-White Partnership: Black Ethnics and African Americans Compared."

Segment 2 -- Sociological insights on the "defund the police" policy label.

Direct download: TWiSP2020m06Thu11audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 8:41pm PDT
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This week we discuss the twin assaults of COVID-19 and police brutality in the United States, and some fundamental challenges both assaults expose. And, I recently spoke with Professor Jessica Calarco of Indiana University about her recent paper titled “Avoiding Us versus Them: How Schools’ Dependence on Privileged ‘Helicopter’ Parents Influences Enforcement of Rules.” The paper was published in the most recent issue of the American Sociological Review.

Segment 1 -- Jessica Calarco on “Avoiding Us versus Them: How Schools' Dependence on Privileged 'Helicopter' Parents Influences Enforcement of Rules."

Segment 2 -- Sociological observations on COVID-19, police brutality, and some challenges these twin assaults are exposing.

Direct download: TWiSPm06Thu04Audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 12:45am PDT
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This week we discuss possible implications of the end of the SAT for admissions to the University of California. And I speak with Professor David Calnitsky of the University of Western Ontario about his recent paper titled “The Impact of an Experimental Guaranteed Income on Crime and Violence.” The paper is to be published in the journal Social Problems, and is co-authored by Pilar Gonalons-Pons.

Segment 1 -- David Calnitsky on “The Impact of an Experimental Guaranteed Income on Crime and Violence"

Segment 2 -- Sociological implications of omitting information from the college application process.

Direct download: TWiSP2020m05Thu28audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 3:08am PDT
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This week we consider how traditions of the press may hinder public understanding. And I talk with Professor Jayanti Owens of Brown University about her recent paper titled “Relationships between an ADHD Diagnosis and Future School Behaviors among Children with Mild Behavioral Problems." The paper is to be published in Sociology of Education.

Segment 1 -- Jayanti Owens on “Relationships between an ADHD Diagnosis and Future School Behaviors among Children with Mild Behavioral Problems

Segment 2 --  Sociological insights on the how traditions of the press may hinder public understanding.

Direct download: TWiSP2020m05Thu21Audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 9:24pm PDT
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This week we consider the implications of possible post-pandemic changes in the organization of work. And I talk with Professor Bryan Sykes of the University of California-Irvine about his paper titled “Institutional Castling: Military Enlistment and Mass Incarceration in the United States.” The paper was recently published in RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences, and is co-authored by Amy Kate Bailey.

Segment 1 -- Bryan Sykes on "Institutional Castling: Military Enlistment and Mass Incarceration in the United States."

Segment 2 --  Sociological insights on the implications of possible post-pandemic changes in the organization of work.

Direct download: TWiSP2020m05Thu14Audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 11:14am PDT
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This week we draw some sociological insights from talks to merge the men's and women's tennis tours. And I talk with Professor Sarah Brayne, of the University of Texas, about her forthcoming paper titled “Technologies of Crime Prediction: The Reception of Algorithms in Policing and Criminal Courts.” The paper is to be published in the journal Social Problems, and is co-authored by Angele Christin.

Segment 1 -- Sarah Brayne on "Technologies of Crime Prediction: The Reception of Algorithms in Policing and Criminal Courts."

Segment 2 --  Sociological insights on Roger Federer and others' efforts to unify the men's and women's tennis tours.

Direct download: TWiSP2020m05Thu07Audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 2:00am PDT
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This week I spoke with Dr. Jan Stets, Professor of Sociology at UC-Riverside. Stets is Director of the Social Psychology Research Laboratory, past Program Director of the Sociology Program at the National Science Foundation, and past editor of Social Psychology Quarterly. I spoke with her about the emotional challenges people are facing owing to the COVID-19 pandemic and our efforts to combat the pandemic. But first, I recently spoke with Kate Strully, Associate Professor of Sociology at the University at Albany, about her recent paper titled “Employer Verification Mandates and Infant Health.” The paper is co-authored by Robert Bozick, Ying Huang, and Lane Burgette, and was published in Population Research and Policy Review.

Segment 1 -- Kate Strully on "Employer Verification Mandates and Infant Health."

Segment 2 -- Jan Stets with a sociological perspective on emotional challenges that accompany the COVID-19 pandemic and our mitigation efforts.

Direct download: TWiSP2020m04Thu30Audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 10:49am PDT
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This week I spoke with Dr. Isaac Ariail Reed, an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Virginia, about the simmering conflict between the federal government and state governments surrounding measures to combat the COVID-19 pandemic. But first, I recently spoke with Dr. Raphael Charron-Chenier, Assistant Professor of Justice and Social Inquiry at Arizona State University, about his recent paper titled “‘Predatory Inclusion in Consumer Credit: Explaining Black and White Disparities in Payday Loan Use”. The paper is scheduled to be published in Sociological Forum.

Segment 1 -- Raphael Charron-Chenier on "Predatory Inclusion in Consumer Credit: Explaining Black and White Disparities in Payday Loan Use."

Segment 2 -- Isaac Ariail Reed on the simmering conflict between states and the federal government in sociological perspective.

 

Direct download: TWiSP2020m04Thu23Audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 7:12pm PDT
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This week we discuss the only story in the news: the Covid-19 pandemic. But first, I recently spoke with Professor Susan Shapiro of the American Bar Foundation about her recent book, Speaking for the Dying: Life-and-Death Decisions in Intensive Care. Professor Shapiro studies the complex context people navigate to make treatment decisions for others in intensive care. The result: An illuminating revelation of the challenges people encounter, and some helpful adjustments we can make in how we approach the prospect of speaking for others in such emotionally difficult times.

Segment 1 -- Susan Shapiro on Speaking for the Dying: Life-and-Death Decisions in Intensive Care.

Segment 2 -- Reflections on the only story in the news--and what we must remember as it is often treated it as such.

Direct download: TWiSP2020m04Thu16audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 4:35pm PDT
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This week we discuss trends in domestic violence in the Covid-19 pandemic. But first, I recently spoke with University of Toronto professor Markus Schafer to discuss some intriguing findings from his recent paper titled “As Goes the City? Older Americans’ Home Upkeep in the Aftermath of the Great Recession.” The paper is scheduled to be published in Social Problems, and is co-authored by Jason Settles and Laura Upenieks.

Segment 1 -- Markus Schafer on "As Goes the City? Older Americans' Home Upkeep in the Aftermath of the Great Recession"

Segment 2 -- "Global Lockdowns Resulting in 'Horrifying Surge' in Domestic Violence, U.N. Warns", NPR; "A Man Killed a Woman And Himself Because He Feared They Had The Coronavirus, Sheriff Says, Buzzfeed News

Direct download: TWiSP2020m04Thu09audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 4:36pm PDT
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This week we discuss what COVID-19 can teach us about what may be coming with climate change. And, I talk with University of Idaho professor Deborah Thorne about some intriguing implications of her recent paper titled “Graying of U.S. Bankruptcy: Fallout from Life in a Risk Society.” The paper is scheduled to be published in Sociological Inquiry, and is co-authored by Pamela Foohey, Robert M. Lawless, and Katherine Porter.

Segment 1 -- Deborah Thorne on "Graying of U.S. Bankruptcy: Fallout from Life in a Risk Society"

Segment 2 -- "How the coronavirus pandemic is crippling California's efforts to prevent catastrophic wildfires"; San Francisco Chronicle

 

 

Direct download: TWiSP2020m03Thu26audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 1:16am PDT
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This week I spoke with Dr. Alexander White, an Assistant Professor of Sociology and the History of Medicine at Johns Hopkins University, about the COVID-19 pandemic in relation to other pandemics in human history. And, I talk with Dr. Allen Hyde, Assistant Professor of Sociology at the Georgia Institute of Technology, about his recent paper titled "'Left Behind?' Financialization and Income Inequality Between the Affluent, Middle Class, and The Poor." The paper is scheduled to be published in Sociological Inquiry.

Segment 1 -- Allen Hyde on "'Left Behind?' Financialization and Income Inequality Between the Affluent, Middle Class, and the Poor."

Segment 2 -- Alexandre White on the COVID-19 pandemic in sociological perspective.

Direct download: TWiSP2020m03Thu19audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 3:44pm PDT
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This week is the anniversary of the grounding of the Boeing MAX 8. We read the debacle in light of sociological research. And I talk with Hope Harvey, Ph.D., a post-doctoral scholar at Cornell University, about some interesting results reported in her recent Social Forces paper titled “Forever Homes and Temporary Stops: Housing Search Logics and Residential Selection” The paper is co-authored by Kelly Fong, Kathryn Edin, and Stefanie DeLuca.

Segment 1 -- Hope Harvey on "Forever Homes and Temporary Stops: Housing Search Logics and Residential Selection"

Segment 2 -- "The insider story of MCAS: How Boeing's 737 MAX system gained power and lost safeguards"; Seattle Times and "Stick Shaker Disagreement Threatens MAX Consensus"; AVWeb

Direct download: TWiSPY2020m03d12audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 2:48pm PDT
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This week we discuss some of the challenges organizations encounter when attempting to move from symbolic change to real change. And I talk with Indiana University Sociology Professor Patricia McManus about some interesting results reported in her recent Social Science Research paper titled “Female labor force participation in the US: How is immigration shaping recent trends?” The paper is co-authored by Kaitlin L. Johnson.

Segment 1 -- Patricia McManus on "Female labor force participation in the US: How is immigration shaping recent trends?"

Segment 2 -- "Ousted Grammys Chief Deborah Dugan is Fired"; New York Times and "All Hell Has Broken Loose Within the Grammys"; Vulture

Direct download: TWiSPY2020m03d05audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 3:34pm PDT
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This week, on the heels of vote-counting controversies in Iowa and Nevada, we identify a potential problem with some California primary election ballots. And, I talk with University of Pennsylvania Sociology Professor Jason Schnittker about some intriguing findings reported in his Journal of Health and Social Behavior paper. The paper is co-authored by Duy Do.

Segment 1 -- Jason Schnittker on "Pharmaceutical Side Effects and Mental Health Paradoxes among Racial-Ethnic Minorities"

Segment 2 -- "Massive changes to California voting spark fears of Iowa-style primary chaos"; Reuters

Direct download: TWiSPm02Thursday27Audio.mp3
Category:Public Affairs -- posted at: 11:28pm PDT
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